First incinerator marks million man hours of work

The new waste incinerator at Ardley.

Steve Radcliff, Clugston managing director, Rod Lerwell, Viridor general manager, Victoria Woods; Chesterton Primary School head, Debbie Seccull, Chesterton Primary School deputy head, Ian McAulay, Viridor chief executive and Stefano Costa of CNIM

First published in News

BUILDING work on Oxfordshire’s first incinerator has reached a milestone.

This month 300 construction workers at the site reached a million man hours working on the £100m project — the equivalent to 114 years.

The controversial burner in Ardley, near Bicester, is expected to open next summer and will be able to take up to 300,000 tonnes of non-recyclable waste a year.

To mark the construction milestone the firm has pledged £10,000 for local charities and organisations – £1,000 for each 100,000 work hours completed at the plant.

Chesterton Primary School, in Chesterton, near Bicester, will be one of the first to get a financial boost.

Headteacher Victoria Woods said: “We are planning to use the money towards the provision of more outdoor resources and activities for the children.

“It is great to see local companies supporting the work local schools and other organisations are doing.”

Ian McAulay, Viridor’s chief executive, said: “With so many activities taking place concurrently on site, reaching this one million hours milestone is a great achievement and testimony to the care and commitment employees and site managers put into every hour of construction work.

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“I would like to congratulate everyone on site and at the same time encourage them to continue working safely to take us toward our next safety achievement.”

Once open, the incinerator will create 24 megawatts of electricity from waste — enough to power the facility and over 38,000 homes.

Comments (1)

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1:42pm Fri 25 Oct 13

nat-obz says...

Yet another case of a company "bribing" local communities with pennies, in contrast to the massive profits it will draw from the waste disposal activities at Ardley.

The County Council has failed to introduce the Community Infrastructure Levy, which would have ensured that Viridor contributed to local infrastructure projects identified by the local community, rather than claiming largesse with its pitifully inadequate £10,000 grant a year.

Viridor's Chief Executive, Ian McAulay, should be pressurised to publicise the profits Viridor currently makes from the Ardley site plus those it estimate will accrue from the incinerator, which will quickly demonstrate what a derisory figure £10,000 a year to local community groups really is!
Yet another case of a company "bribing" local communities with pennies, in contrast to the massive profits it will draw from the waste disposal activities at Ardley. The County Council has failed to introduce the Community Infrastructure Levy, which would have ensured that Viridor contributed to local infrastructure projects identified by the local community, rather than claiming largesse with its pitifully inadequate £10,000 grant a year. Viridor's Chief Executive, Ian McAulay, should be pressurised to publicise the profits Viridor currently makes from the Ardley site plus those it estimate will accrue from the incinerator, which will quickly demonstrate what a derisory figure £10,000 a year to local community groups really is! nat-obz
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