A BAN on pavement parking could be considered to stop selfish drivers who put block pedestrians' pathway.

The Government has launched an inquiry into pavement parking, inviting people to share their experiences and suggest solutions as to how it should be tackled.

Its transport committee is calling for evidence to justify a potential 'reform of traffic regulation' - which could include a ban on people putting their wheels over the kerb.

Pavement parking is a persistent issue across Oxfordshire, with complaints about 'near misses' as pedestrians are forced into the road.

On Wednesday an anonymous resident posted photos of cars blocking the pavement next to Between Towns Road in Cowley.

Reporting the issue via the FixMyStreet website, the complaint said: "Vehicles are parking on the footpath next to the derelict Murco garage on a daily basis.

"[This is] causing an obstruction to the walking public, those with pushchairs and mobility scooters."

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Pavement parking Oxford - send us your examples

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ALSO READ: Oxford schools complain of parking 'chaos'

There is no national ban against either pavement parking, except in London and more widely for heavy commercial vehicles.

Elsewhere drivers are permitted to partially park on the pavement, as long as it is not in a 'dangerous position' or causing an obstruction.

Confusingly, it is an offence to drive onto the pavement, whether with intention to park or not.

This is a criminal offence enforced by the police, as opposed to the vast majority of civil parking offences policed by councils, and rarely enforced.

Last month a mother posted on the Bicester General Chat Facebook page reporting a 'near miss' after she was forced to dodge a parked car.

She said: "I had to walk on the road with my 10-month-old in her pram as both sides of the pavement were completely blocked by cars.

"The pram was centimetres away from being hit by a car which came round the corner, obviously not expecting me to be in the road."

One Headington resident told the Oxford Mail she is 'fed up with inconsiderate parking' in East Field Close.

She shared this photo of a Mini completely blocking the width of the pavement at the weekend, right next to a give-way junction, and said it had been parked there for three days.

Bicester Advertiser:

One mother posted on the Kennington Connected! public Facebook page on Sunday, shaming a driver who had blocked the full width of the pavement in Bagley Close.

She wrote: "My five-year-old old boy's playtime was cut short due to inconsiderate parking for the whole afternoon by this red car.

"PAVEMENTS ARE FOR PEDESTRIANS NOT PARKING."

ALSO READ: School to shame parents with pictures if parking issue persists

Inconsiderate parking is a regular feature on the page, as with many other residents' groups in other villages and towns.

In response to a similar complaint last month, one villager wrote: "The way the cars were parked in a line this morning meant that you had a lady having to walk on the road with a buggy with poor visibility.

"I can’t help but feel it’s an accident simply waiting to happen and it’s so obvious and avoidable."

Another added: "I have a friend who is wheelchair bound and with her service dog cannot get into Oxford due to the parking on the pavements. This is very frustrating for her and restricts her social life."

In some streets, the designated parking bays are actually marked out to include part of the pavement, such as in Aston Street in East Oxford.

Bicester Advertiser:

Pic: Google Maps

These are exempt from the rules and Oxfordshire County Council guidance states: "To ensure pedestrians are not obstructed, vehicles parked even slightly farther onto the footway than shown by the bay markings may be issued with a penalty charge notice."

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Many schools have written to parents previously about parking concerns, and some are taking proactive measures.

According to the April newsletter from St Swithun's CE Primary School in Kennington, pupils on the school council have been working to improve parking in the vicinity of the site during drop-off and pick-up times.

The letter stated: "With the help of two of our police community support officers, the children have been out and about at the start and end of the school day, canvassing opinions. They did incredibly well!

"We have now got lots of information to analyse, which will be the next stage of the process."

Don't forget to tell us where the pictures were taken!

Parked on pavement, Partridge Walk, Oxford

Parked on pavement, Partridge Walk, Oxford
Community contributor

Have to walk into road not enough room between car and lamppost in Barton

Have to walk into road not enough room between car and lamppost in Barton
Community contributor

Car parked fully on pavement on corner of Brake Hill and Partridge Walk in Greater Leys. Pavement is completely blocked and there’s no way of getting past without walking in the road.

Car parked fully on pavement on corner of Brake Hill and Partridge Walk in Greater Leys. Pavement is completely blocked and there’s no way of getting past without walking in the road.
Community contributor

Just off Barns road. Completely blocked pavement.

Just off Barns road. Completely blocked pavement.
Community contributor

Parking along Barton Road cross over double yellow lines to park on path and grass. Obstructing view.

Parking along Barton Road cross over double yellow lines to park on path and grass. Obstructing view.
Community contributor

Pavement parking - advice from the RAC:

"Outside of London, we advise people to use common sense when faced with no other option but to park on the pavement.

"If you are parking along a narrow road, where parking wholly on the road would stop other cars, and particularly emergency vehicles, from getting through, then it is a sensible option to park partially on a pavement, providing there are no parking restrictions and providing you are not blocking a wheelchair user or pram from using the pavement.

"If there are restrictions, or your parking would cause wheelchair users or people with prams to have to walk into the road, then you should find somewhere else to park."